General product information

1. Where can I buy Happy Planet Creamery products

Happy Planet Creamery product are available mostly in BC. They can be found at Natural Food stores such as Choices Market, Whole Foods Markets and in many independent retailers. To find the store nearest to you click here. Or contact us at hellocreamery@happyplanet.com

2. How can I get Happy Planet Creamery in my store?

Happy Planet Creamery products can be ordered through the regional distributors, Horizon and Pro-Organics. Please send us an email at milkshaker@happyplanet.com for more information.

3. Can I drop in to the farm?

Our farmers are very busy running the daily business of a small family farm every day. They will open their door and allow visitors on specific days. If you wish to be on the invitation list, please send us an email: hellocreamery@happyplanet.com

4. Is your milk pasteurized?

Our milk is pasteurized as it is required by Canada’s Law. Pasteurization is the process of heating milk to a temperature high enough to kill any disease causing bacteria that may be present in milk.

5. Is your milk homogenized?

All Happy Planet Creamery milk fluids are homogenized in order to provide a smooth drinkable consistency. Without homogenization, the cream in the milk would separate and rise to the top of the bottle.

6. Are Happy Planet Creamery gluten free?

Yes, none of our product contain gluten.

7. What is the fat percentage in you butter?

The butter fat content is 84%, much higher than regular butterfat (that is 80%).

The Happy Planet Creamery fine butter is a European Style Butter churned longer than traditional butters, which decreases the moisture content and increases the butterfat content to 84%. The butter is churned in a custom made barrel-style churner. Higher butterfat content intensifies our butter flavour and creaminess, while less moisture makes our butter a superb choice to be enjoyed on bread, in baking and cooking.

References

  1. Liu H et al. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions through replacement of chemical fertilizer with organic manure in a temperate farmland. Article Earth Sciences, Science Bulletin, March 2015, Volume 60, Issue 6, pp 598-606. View info
  2. The Rodale Institute. (2014) Regenerative Organic Agriculture and Climate Change:
    A Down-to-Earth Solution to Global Warming View info
  3. Caprio E et al. (2015) Organic versus conventional systems in viticulture: Comparative effects on spiders and carabids in vineyards and adjacent forests. Agricultural Systems, Volume 136, June 2015, Pages 61-69. View info
  4. Henckel L, Bo¨rger L, Meiss H, Gaba S, Bretagnolle V. (2015) Organic fields sustain weed metacommunity dynamics in farmland landscapes. Proc. R. Soc. B 282: 20150002. View info
  5. Benoit M et al. (2015) Nitrous oxide emissions and nitrate leaching in an organic and a conventional cropping system (Seine basin, France), Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, Volume 213, 25 December 2015, Pages 131-141. View info
  6. Cambardella, C. A.; Delate, K; Jaynes, D. B. (2015) Water Quality in Organic Systems. Sustainable Agriculture Research, [S.l.], v. 4, n. 3, p. p60, jun. 2015. View info
  7. Lynch, D.H.; MacRae, R.; Martin, R.C. The Carbon and Global Warming Potential Impacts of Organic Farming: Does It Have a Significant Role in an Energy Constrained World? Sustainability 2011, 3, 322-362. View info
  8. Baranski, M et al. (2014) Higher antioxidant and lower cadmium concentrations and lower incidence of pesticide residues in organically grown crops: a systematic literature review and meta-analyses. British Journal of Nutrition (2014), 112, pgs. 794–811 View info
  9. Curl C.L. et al. (2015) Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Environmental Health Perspectives, Environmental Health Perspectives, volume 123, number 5, (2015) pgs 475-483. View info
  10. Bouchard M.F. et al. (2010) Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate Pesticides. Pediatrics (American Academy of Pediatrics) Volume 125, Number 6, (2010) Pgs 1270 – 1277. View info
  11. Hall, J. B., Silver S. (2009) Nutrition and Feeding of the Cow-Calf Herd: Digestive System of the Cow. Virginia Cooperative Extension (2009) Publication 400-010. View info
  12. Peeples, L. (2010) Is milk from grass-fed cows more heart-healthy? Reuters, IHealth, May 28, 2010 View info
  13. Sterigardis C. et al. (2015)A 2-year study on milk quality from three pasture-based dairy systems of contrasting production intensities in Wales. The Journal of Agricultural Science, 153, pp 708-731. (2015). View info
  14. Dilzer, A., Park, Y. (2012) Implication of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in human health. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr;52:488–513. View info
  15. Connor, W. E.(2000) Importance of n-3 fatty acids in health and disease. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 71 (Suppl.):171S–175S. View info
  16. Benbrook CM, Butler G, Latif MA, Leifert C, David DR (2013) Organic production enhances milk nutritional quality by shifting fatty acid composition: a United States-wide, 18-month study. PLoS One. 2013 Dec 9;8(12):e82429. View info
  17. Butlera G. et al. (2011). The effects of dairy management and processing on quality characteristics of milk and dairy products. NJAS – Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences. Volume 58, Issues 3–4, December 2011, Pages 97–102 View info
  18. Stergiadis S, Seal CJ, Leifert C, Eyre MD, Larsen MK, Butler G. (2013) Variation in nutritionally relevant components in retail Jersey and Guernsey whole milk. Food Chemistry 2013, 139(1-4), 540-548. View info
  19. Palladino, R. A., F. Buckley, R. Prendiville, J. J. Murphy, J. Callan, and D. A. Kenny. (2010) A comparison between Holstein-Friesian and Jersey dairy cows and their F1 hybrid on milk fatty acid composition under grazing conditions. J. Dairy Sci. 93:2176–2184 View info
  20. The Cattle Site (check out info on Brown Swiss, Guernseys, and Jerseys)
  21. keithwoodford.wordpress.com
  22. www.plastics.ca
    plasticsinfo.org
  23. livestockconservancy.org
  24. http://www.cancer.ca/en/prevention-and-screening/be-aware/cancer-myths-and-controversies/disposable-water-bottles/?region=on

COMPANY & PHILOSOPHY

1. What is the story of Happy Planet?

Randal Ius and his high school friend Gregor Robertson were two Vancouver boys with big dreams. It all started in 1994 on an organic farm in Abbotsford, BC; equipped with a big blender and fresh organic carrots the boys started concocting juices and smoothies to give city people a taste of the country. They called their business Happy Planet.

Today, through perseverance, a good dose of passion (and a few hurdles on the way), Happy Planet is Canada’s leading all natural food and juice company. We continue to make great smoothies and juices. We make fresh, delicious, all-natural and organic soups too… and now delicious dairy products. We’ve not made all the planet happy yet, but it’s a good start.

2. How is Happy Planet Creamery associated with Happy Planet?

Happy Planet Creamery embodies the same vision and values which have been part of Happy Planet’s for the past 20+ years. We remain true to what we stand for: to astonish people’s taste buds, nourish their body, unite them with the best source of food and drink on this planet and help build and support our communities and farmers while growing a progressive business.

3. How did the idea for the Creamery come about?

Being raised in a food loving family and himself passionate about natural food, Happy Planet co-founder Randal Ius had always wanted to do for dairy what he did for juices, smoothies and fresh soups.  And doing it the Happy Planet way…

That is teaming up with the best farmers dedicated to organic and sustainable practices. In the case of our new Creamery – it’s all about partnering with the best local dairy farmers and letting consumers know where their milk is coming from, that the milk is based on quality not quantity and the cows are pastured eating grass, basking in the sun doing the things that make them really happy.  Happy Planet Creamery – it’s old fashioned – its Dairy as good as it can be!

Dairy as good as it can be

1. What makes Happy Planet Creamery products different?

We all want to know where our food comes from, and want products that are highly nutritious with an awesome taste. At Happy Planet Creamery, we want to deliver the authentic experience you have been waiting for.

Happy Planet Creamery milk is from local farm, it is delicious and of the highest quality, providing unique benefits not found in regular milk.

Our milk is CERTIFIED ORGANIC; it’s NON-GMO, and is produced by happy healthy GRASS FED cows that graze on lush organic pastures during the grazing season and have year-round access to the outdoors. Research indicates that milk from pasture-raised cows contains more beneficial fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), omega-3 fatty acids, and beta-carotene than is found in regular milk. These are important nutrients for human health.

In addition, our milk is TRACEABLE from farm to table and comes from HERITAGE BREEDS such as Jersey, Gurnsey and Brown Swiss cows that are known for their creamy, flavourful milk. Also known as “ancient” breeds, their milk is higher in protein, calcium, and beneficial fatty acids than milk from breeds more commonly used for commercial production such as Holsteins.

Plus, our farmer partners are dedicated organic producers who are innovative, creative, community-minded folks. They’re committed to the highest standards of animal welfare and environmentally sustainable farming practices, avoiding the use of toxic persistent pesticides, and taking great care of the soil, air, water and community.

2. Is Happy Planet Creamery certified organic?

Our milks and butter are certified organic.

3. What does Certified Organic mean?

Organic refers to the way agricultural products are grown and processed. Organic foods are produced in an environmentally sustainable and socially responsible manner focusing on soil health, biodiversity, water conservation and animal welfare. Organic also means Non-GMO since the use of GMOs in seeds, animal feed, and in the ingredients of processed products is prohibited in organic production.

Organic certification lets consumers know that a product’s organic integrity has been protected and maintained from field to table through a system of stringent government organic standards and regulations.

If a product is certified, you can be sure that it’s organic!

4. What is the Canada Organic program all about?

In Canada, organic producers must adhere to rigorous organic production and animal welfare standards under the Organic Products Regulations, the Canada Organic Standards and the Permitted Substances List within the Canada Organic Regime– a.k.a. the Canada Organic program.

Canada’s organic standards are recognized around the world, and prohibit the use of toxic and persistent pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, synthetic hormones, animal cloning, genetic engineering (“GMOs”), sewage sludge, irradiation, and the routine use of antibiotics in dairy production. Organic standards also forbid the use of artificial food colours, flavours, sweeteners, preservatives and many other processing aids and ingredients traditionally used in processed foods.

Organic dairy producers also comply with the animal welfare standards of the National Farm Animal Care Council Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Dairy Cattle, which are referenced in the Canada Organic Standards.

The organic certification process includes detailed record-keeping, audits, and on-site inspections by third party certifiers. Happy Planet Creamery’s products are certified organic by the Pacific Agricultural Certification Society (PACS) – a BC organic certification body accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Look for the Canada Organic logo for your organic guarantee!

5. Is organic non-GMO?

Yes, as per Canada’s organic standards organic also means non-GMO. The use of GMOs in seeds, animal feed, and in the ingredients of processed products is strictly prohibited in organic production.

6. What are the benefits of grass fed dairy products?

For cows: Diets high in nutritious grass and forages are healthier for cows than grain-heavy/concentrate-rich diets typical of commercial milk production. As ruminants, their unique digestive system and pH neutral stomach are a perfect match with grasses and other plants found in pastures (11).

For consumers: Extensive research indicates that milk from grass fed cows contains significantly more omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), and beta-carotene than is found in regular milk(12)(13). These beneficial fatty acids are important nutrients for human health, prized for their heart-healthy, cancer-fighting, and immune-boosting properties (14)(15).

Grass fed milk has a healthier ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 fats compared to regular non-grass fed milk. Omega-3 fats can’t do their good work if they’re crowded out by excess omega-6 fats. Grass fed milk contains up to 3x more omega 3s than omega 6s, achieving omega6:omega3 ratios that are a 300% improvement over regular milk!

7. Why milk from Heritage Breeds cows?

The answer is simple: “Heritage” or “Ancient” dairy breeds such as Jerseys, Jersey crosses, Brown Swiss and Guernseys are known for their superbly creamy and flavourful milk full of healthful benefits. Their milk has a higher percentage of butterfat, calcium, beta carotene, omega 3s and A2 protein than modern domestic breeds like Holsteins (18) (19) (20). These breeds are also known to do well on a pasture-based diet.

Transparency and Product Traceability

1. Where does the Happy Planet Creamery milk come from?

Our milk comes from 2 family organic farms in BC. Creekside Dairy in Agassiz and Branmaid farm in Abbotsford. Julaine & Johannes Treur, and Wayne Brandsema, our partner farmers are holding themselves to exceptionally high farming standards and provide to the best quality care possible to their cows and their land.

Our farmers are part of a movement in their community who believe in leaving this planet better than the way we found it, and in transparency with consumers. Dairy farms have always been part of their lives, and they’ve integrated science into farming and providing full transparency to consumers. They are innovative, creative, community-minded farmers highly committed to superior milk quality, animal welfare and sustainability. You’ll also thank them for doing such a great work!!

2. How is Happy Planet Creamery milk traceable?

Production transparency and product traceability are key components of organic systems, and are an important part of Happy Planet Creamery’s program. We can trace our organic products from the farm to your table and make sure that organic integrity is maintained all the way through.

In addition, milk from our farmer partners is transported, stored, and processed separately from all other milk in the BC Milk Pool. That means that our milk can be traced directly back to our farmers’ cows so you know exactly where your milk is coming from (note that in BC, conventional or organic milk is normally collected and pooled by the BC Milk Marketing Board before being sold to the processing and bottling companies).

The organic certification process includes detailed record-keeping, audits, and on-site inspections by third party certifiers. Happy Planet Creamery’s products are certified organic by the Pacific Agricultural Certification Society (PACS) – a BC organic certification body accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Happy Planet Creamery products are Local, Organic, Grass Fed & Traceable!

Farms and Animals

1. What are Heritage breeds?

Heritage breeds are traditional livestock breeds that were raised by farmers in the past, before the drastic reduction of breed variety caused by the rise of industrial agriculture. Heritage is an umbrella term that embraces pure breeds of livestock.

Heritage animals were bred over time to develop traits that made them particularly well-adapted to local environmental conditions. Cows breeds used in industrial agriculture are bred to produce lots of milk, gain weight quickly, within confined facilities. Heritage breeds are generally better adapted to withstand disease and survive in tough environmental conditions, and they thrive in pasture-based settings, which result in milk that is has a richer and more flavourful taste with higher nutrition content.

Jersey milk has 18% more protein, 20% more calcium, 25% more butterfat than “average” milk.

Guernsey milk contains 12% more protein, 30% more cream, 33% more vitamin D, 25% more vitamin A and 15% more calcium than average milk. (20) (23)

2. What do Happy Planet Creamery’s cows eat?

Our cows are grass fed, as nature intended. Their diet consists primarily of fresh organic grasses and legumes (eg. alfalfa, clovers, rye) during the grazing season from April to October, sometimes longer weather permitting. Grazed forage is 40% to 50% of total forage intake during the grazing season. During the winter months, cows eat mainly stored forages such as organic hay and silage. Our farmers grow most of their own feed to ensure their cows get the most nutritious and balanced food possible.

65%-70% of the diet of their organic dairy cows consist of fresh grasses (April to October) or fresh/dried grasses (November to March), hay, or ensiled forage. Farmers provide a balanced diet to ensure animal health and production of 22-24L ave of highly nutritious milk per day (Holsteins produce 30-34L of organic or conventional milk)

The rest of the diet consists of supplementation, such as barley and ground flaxseed, to promote milk production high in CLA, Omega 3s and healthy omega 6:3 ratio (between 1:1 and 1:3) as well as minerals and nutrients to meet cows’ nutritional needs and maintain their health. It’s tough for cows to produce milk on grass alone, especially during periods of high milk production after calving and when temperatures drop. Our farmers ensure their cows are healthy, happy, and well-fed.

Happy Planet Creamery organic cows enjoy the best of the best! – nutritious organic forages and pasture, and year-round access to the great outdoors.

3. What are the benefits of grass fed dairy products?

For cows: Diets high in nutritious grass and forages are healthier for cows than grain-heavy/concentrate-rich diets typical of commercial milk production. As ruminants, their unique digestive system and pH neutral stomach are a perfect match with grasses and other plants found in pastures (11).

For you: Extensive research indicates that milk from grass fed cows contains significantly more omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), and beta-carotene than is found in regular milk(12)(13). These beneficial fatty acids are important nutrients for human health, prized for their heart-healthy, cancer-fighting, and immune-boosting properties (14)(15).

Grass fed milk has a healthier ratio of omega 6 to omega 3 fats compared to regular non-grass fed milk. Omega-3 fats can’t do their good work if they’re crowded out by excess omega-6 fats. Grass fed milk contains up to 3x more omega 3s than omega 6s, achieving omega6:omega3 ratios that are a 300% improvement over regular milk!

4. What’s so great about organic dairy production?

Happy Planet Creamery’s organic milk is produced by dairy farmers who are amongst the finest in British Columbia, in fact in all of Canada! They’re dedicated organic producers who take extra good care of their land, animals, and environment, and meet our high standards for product quality.

Organic agriculture is not only about avoiding the use of agri-chemicals but is an active labour-intensive process focused on nurturing healthy soil, plants and animals.

For example, organic farmers use cover crops (such as nitrogen-fixing alfalfa), quality compost, crop and pasture rotations to nourish and regenerate the soil. Healthy soil grows healthy plants that nourish healthy animals!

Organic farmers pasture their cows during the grazing season and provide access to the outdoors all year round. Fresh air, sun, exercise and a diet high in nutritious organic grasses/forages are important for animal health and milk production. Healthy cows produce healthy delicious milk! Organic farming also promotes environmentally sustainable and climate-friendly food production since it stores higher levels of carbon in the soil (1)(2), promotes ecological diversity (3)(4), prevents soil erosion and water contamination (5)(6), and uses far less energy than conventional farming (7).

By choosing organic, you’re eating delicious and nutritious food (8), minimizing your exposure to GMOs (21) and pesticides (9)(10), and reducing your carbon footprint (7)!

Check out thinkcanadaorganic.ca for more info on benefits of organic production.

5. What is our stance on antibiotics?

In organic dairy production, natural remedies such as homeopathy, herbals, or other alternative treatments are the first course of action if animals become ill. Antibiotics are permitted only as a last resort treatment, if the animal’s health is jeopardized.

If an organic cow is treated with antibiotics, her milk is discarded and is not included in the milk from the herd for a period of 30 days or twice as long as the recommended withdrawal period on the drug’s label, whichever is longer. This lengthy withdrawal period ensures there is absolutely no trace of antibiotics in the milk destined for your table.

Environment

1. How does organic dairy production reduce carbon footprints?

Carbon footprint is measured in terms of total energy use and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. Widespread research indicates that organic dairy farming uses much less energy, releases a lower amount of GHGs into the atmosphere and stores more carbon in the soil than conventional agriculture(7).

Here’s how: Organic farmers use natural, energy efficient animal and plant manures to fertilize and build the soil, while conventional farmers use chemical fertilizers that are highly energy-intensive and are produced using large amounts of natural gas and coal.

Organic farmers use perennial grasses and legumes in rotation which are much more energy efficient than annuals. Grazing cows naturally fertilize pastures with their manure, trampling and working it into soil with other decaying organic matter, turning it into rich humus. Healthy soil grows healthy pasture grasses. The rootsof the perennials in turn help keep the soil healthy by retaining water and microbes and healthy soil keeps carbon dioxide in the ground and out of the atmosphere.

2. Is the Happy Planet Creamery milk bottle recyclable?

The Happy Planet Creamery bottle and its cap are recyclable. It is made of PET (Polyethylene Terephthalatae) that is very recyclable (the bottle is code #1 container; the cap is code #5). Most PET is recycled into high value textiles used for fleece sweatshirts, non –allergenic fillings for pillows and sleeping bags; they can also be recycle back into bottles.

3. Is the Happy Planet Creamery milk bottle BPA free?

Yes, the bottle is BPA free. Neither dioxins nor Bisphenol-A are used in the manufacture of PET bottles.

4. Is the Happy Planet Creamery milk bottle material safe for my health?

PET has been approved by Health Canada and other leading world health organizations (such as the USDA) for food-contact use. PET is an inert plastic and does not leach harmful materials into its content. PET beverage bottles are designed for single use, but the plastic poses no danger when refilled. According to the Canadian Cancer Society “there is no evidence that re-using disposable plastic bottles can cause cancer”.  If reusing the bottle, we recommend that you clean it thoroughly to prevent the growth of bacteria. (22) (24)

5. How is PET bottle a valuable packaging choice that helps reduce environmental impact?

The light weight of PET bottles reduces the quantity of fuel required for transport. Using less fuel reduces greenhouse gas emissions as well as emissions responsible for smoke.

Less than 50g of PET is used to manufacture a 2L bottle. Approximately 2,000g of glass would be required to do the same job.

But using new materials – PET bottle- on the bottling line, we avoid the chemical cleaning and heavy rinsing that occur when using glass packaging. (22) More information at www.plastics.ca and plasticsinfo.org